Conferences

ICEM 2014, Agria Media 2014, ICI 13, CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 8-10, 2014, EGER, HUNGARY

(Selected Abstracts)

Printed version (ISBN:978-615-5621-15-4) with all the abstracts and papers is available here

 

 

 

Table of Contents:

 

  1. ANUWAR, Ali: E-LEARNING AT OPEN UNIVERSITY MALAYSIA: RECENT DEVELOPMENTS
  2. BORROMEO, Ria Mae: Automatic Generation of Moodle Quiz Questions for Computer
  3. CAMPBELL, Chris: Utilising learning design approaches to embed technological innovation
  4. CUERVO, Diego Mauricio Mazo: Towards a customized model in Business Manager training, in Virtual Learning Environments.
  5. CORNELL, Richard, PAN, Cheng Chang: ICT in ICEM's World of Knowledge: Seeking Projects From Affiliated Organizations
  6. DOBOZY, Eva: IS LURKING BAD? INVESTIGATING STUDENT ENGAGEMENT PATTERNS IN ONLINE LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS
  7. EL-MASHAD, Yehia: An Adaptive E-Learning System Based on 3D Virtual Environment
  8. EL-MASHAD, Yehia: Assessment and Evaluation Process for the Management Information System Program at Delta Academy
  9. FANG, Linda: USE OF WHATSAPP IN A TRANS-NATIONAL STUDIES SUBJECT IN SINGAPORE
  10. LIBRERO, Al Francis D.: Integrating an ePortfolio system in an online environment for higher learning
  11. LIBRERO, Al Francis D.: Benefits and challenges of online learning in a virtual world: the UPOU setting
  12. LOUREIRO, Maria Joao, POMBO, Luci: Doctoral students' use of digital technologies in research processes
  13. MELÉNDEZ, A. Gabriel: Film as Social Curricula
  14. NIEMEYER, Dodie, GERBER, Hannah R.: Maker Culture in Videogames and Virtual Worlds: from Minecraft to the Classroom and Beyond
  15. PAN, Cheng Chang (Sam), CORNELL, Richard: Design of online courses in higher education in light of the interplay between design maturity and student satisfaction: An observation made by thinking like an economist
  16. PAN, Cheng Chang (Sam), GARCIA, Francisco, DOLDSMITH, Clair: Technology and me - what do students think?
  17. PLÉH, Csaba: Cognitive and instruction science face the challenge of the new media
  18. STEVENSON, Michael, HEDBERG, John: Leading Learning in a Digital Age: a Mixed Methods Study
  19. SHEFFIELD, Rachel, DOBOZY, Eva, CAMPBELL, Chris: Teaching With Tpack: A Case Study of Pre-Service Science Education
  20. STRAATEMEIER, Marthe: Math Garden: combining online adaptive training and monitoring of arithmetic skills in educational games
  21. CHIERO, Robin, BEARE, Paul, MARSHALL James, TORGERSON, Colleen: Evaluating the Effectiveness of E-Learning in Teacher Preparation
  22. TU, Chih-Hsiung: An Examination of Gaming Personality and Gaming Dynamics
  23. VRASIDAS, Charalambos: Digital Alphabet Books and Science Fiction in Education: Two case studies of Literacy Projects
  24. VRASIDAS, Charalambos, Theodoridou, Katerina, Avraamidou, Christiana Aravi Lucy: Science Fiction in Education: Case studies from classroom implementations
  25. WIT, Hans De: Collaborative Online International Learning and Virtual Exchange, new forms of internationalisation in higher education
  26. GERBER, Hannah R., PRICE, Debra P., MILLER, Melinda S.: Connective Research Approaches: A Methodological Framework for Researching Games-Based Learning
  27. GERBER, Hannah R., PRICE, Debra P., MILLER, Melinda S., VOTTELER, Nancy K.: Connective Research Approaches: A Methodological Framework for Researching Games-Based Learning
  28. NEMOTO, Keisuke, SHIOTA, Shingo, KOBAYASHI, Keita, ONODA, Hiroshi, NAGATA, Katsuya: Development and Application of a Teaching Method Using a Communication Robot - Based on the Concept of a Weak Robot -
  29. SAKAI Kyohei; SHIOTA Shingo; MASUKAWA Hiroyuki; MATSUDA Naoko: Workshop on Internet Addiction -Development of the Internet Addiction Scale by Junior High School Students
  30. VRASIDAS, Charalambos, Themistokleous Sotiris, Aravi Christiana: Make the Link 
 

 

1. ANUWAR, Ali: E-LEARNING AT OPEN UNIVERSITY MALAYSIA: RECENT DEVELOPMENTS

Rapid developments in information and communication technology (ICT) have led to the creation of many innovative practices in all areas of life, including those in higher education. Today, the ubiquitous use of mobile devices, widespread access to the Internet and the inevitable influence of social networking on the way people connect with one another has imbued teaching and learning practices with a new, technology-led perspective. This is especially evident in the open and distance learning (ODL) approach, where e-learning has expanded from a single component in a blended learning pedagogy to a comprehensive and all-inclusive educational method using multimedia-rich learning materials and online platforms as well as leveraging on the expertise of the global education community. This presentation will describe current global developments in e-learning and proceed to illustrate the e-learning approach at Open University Malaysia (OUM). As Malaysia's premier ODL institution, OUM has channelled significant efforts to develop components and innovations related to e-learning, resulting in several unique initiatives previously unheard of in the co- untry. As an ODL institution, OUM also continues to seek novel ways to improve our e- learning delivery, and this includes keeping abreast with emerging ideas and new concepts in ICT and higher education. We certainly believe that the convergence of an open, accessible and flexible approach espoused in ODL with many exciting advancements in ICT will create a future that is positive and enriching for all e-learning providers.

2. BORROMEO, Ria Mae: Automatic Generation of Moodle Quiz Questions for Computer

A computer is a device that can be programmed to perform mathematical operations such as arithmetic operations. However, these operations are different than the arithmetic operations we perform everyday because they use a different number system. In the study of computers, computer number systems are necessary to understand how computers work and process information. Courses in the Diploma of Computer Science and Bachelor of Arts in Multimedia Studies at the University of the Philippines Open University tackle computer number systems and its operations. Similar to other Math courses such as Algebra, computing in computer number systems is a skill, which needs practice to be honed. Thus, in such courses, quizzes and exercises to practice on are necessary. In this study, a web application that automatically generates questions for computer number systems operations was developed. The system takes in the operation and number range as input then outputs a question, which can be directly imported in the Moodle Quiz module for the students to answer. The system may enable teachers create questions easier and give students more questions to practice on in order to develop their skill in computer number systems computing. In the future, the system may also be extended to generate questions from other topics with answers that can be derived from formulas.

3. CAMPBELL, Chris: Utilising learning design approaches to embed technological innovation

Technology is recognised for its ability to support learner engagement in a variety of teaching and learning environments including large classes. However, in spite of its pervasiveness and the affordances it offers many university teachers do not utilise available technological teaching and learning tools to engage learners, particularly in large classes, where engagement can be a significant issue. In many cases, this is due to a lack of understanding as to how to design teaching and learning activities to exploit available technologies.

Massingham and Herrington's (2006) study reports that the most influential factors on student experiences are actually the teaching processes used in class, for example, constructivist instead of transmissive, with constructivist learning being that students learn through active engagement while constructing knowledge. Their explanation that the teaching and the learning environment has shifted from the "teacher-centred instruction, information, passive and individual learning" to active learning with "more emphasis...on approaches that involve problem solving, collaboration, discussion, authentic contexts, and action" reminds those of us working in university environments of the need to investigate new ways of engaging our students (p. 85). This research shows that staff who use a constructivist learning environment can actually engage students.

However, while there is considerable recognition by university teachers that active learning approaches can promote positive learning outcomes, lack of learning design understanding and support is an inhibiting factor in successful and widespread adoption of technological innovation. This papers explores a number of approaches to learning design including the Gradual Release of Responsibilit

4. CUERVO, Diego Mauricio Mazo: Towards a customized model in Business Manager training, in Virtual Learning Environments.

Research Objective: To present the pedagogical outcomes of the renewal of CEIPA Business School's virtual education model, from the recognition of each student's particular circumstances and the opportunities offered by E-learning, both in the optimization of materials and the interaction between learners.

Research Methods: The research method is qualitative and uses the prospective approach, focusing on trends analysis and the design of future scenarios.

Key findings:

-            The Problem-posing educational model in virtual environments derives from entrepreneurial issues and not from particular disciplinary logic.

-          Education must be individualized. Consequently the pace of work and interaction or interactivity levels will be determined by the skills and interests of each student.

-  The students' work-life will be an integral part of their curricular process.

-         The professionals' training process won't be divided into particular topics addressed by a teacher. Instead, there will be a system of experts who will carry out various roles throughout the students' learning process.

Theoretical and practical relevance: The findings of this research point out the way to reform CEIPA Business School's online training process of business managers; while showing a redefinition of the role of teachers in virtual education, from a constructivist perspective.

 

5. CORNELL, Richard, PAN, Cheng Chang: ICT in ICEM's World of Knowledge: Seeking Projects From Affiliated Organizations

In 2013 in Singapore, we traced ICEM and AECT historical antecedents and found similarities, mainly those that evolved in the respective organizations' formative years. Yet, over time the emphasis on collective projects within ICEM faded to give way to a litany of professional conferences and publications that reflected international research, conducted mainly by professors, many of whom were seeking promotion and tenure.

We suggest it may be time to reappraise the goals and objectives of ICEM and to incorporate a broader universe of participants, beginning with those who now have become international affiliated organizations with AECT. To test our premise we will conduct a survey of our AECT affiliated international organizations in which we ask each nation to identify examples of project-based ICT activities, from both past and present, with their suggestions as to what projects they might undertake in the future and in what capacity, format, place, topic, and stated goals with suggested partners and budgets that align with what they wish to accomplish.

The survey will be sent to the presidents of the ICT-related organizations affiliated with AECT to look at higher education related projects. We will ask that the AECT-affiliated organizations convene a meeting (in person or via digital interaction) to

(a)          obtain a list of previous projects conducted by the nation that were related to ICT in higher education,

(b)          describe the scope and objectives of some of the successful and unsuccessful projects and offer reasons as to why the projects were or were not successful, and

(c)         offer ideas as to how they, working in collaboration with both ICEM and AECT, could engage in unique collaborative efforts not seen in decades within ICEM.

We look forward to sharing our results with you at ICEM-Hungary!

 

 

6. DOBOZY, Eva: IS LURKING BAD? INVESTIGATING STUDENT ENGAGEMENT PATTERNS IN ONLINE LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS

The engagement of students in online learning environments continues to be a 'hot topic'. The present paper will report on student participation patterns with highly interactive online learning activities that were presented to students studying in blended (face- to-face and online) learning modes. Three LAMS sequences were offered to first-year teacher education students in a technology unit to support their learning and to help them build connections with other students outside of the regular classroom environment. The pedagogy underpinning the learning design of the LAMS sequences was based on Vygotskian social learning theory.

The focus of this part of the study concerned student consumer behaviour and their invisible participation, which was a surprising finding that warrants further investigation. Hence, the research questions to be addressed were: What constitutes 'lurking'? What proportion of the participants exhibited 'learning behaviours'? Is 'lurking' bad?

The paper provides a clear definition of the two interrelated concepts of 'lurking' and 'consumer students'. Further, it will illustrate that lurkers are appreciative of the possibility to engage with non-traditional and highly interactive online learning activities during their studies. However, the findings make overt that consumer students are not ready to switch modes and contribute to discussion and debate. They choose to remain invisible participants as opposed to being absent from the learning experience. Some implications for practice and the need for further research into student learning behaviour and lurkers' motivation to remain invisible will be outlined.

 

7. EL-MASHAD, Yehia: An Adaptive E-Learning System Based on 3D Virtual Environment

Education is considered as one of the most important sectors all over the world. Many universites and companies turned to e-learning/distance education. E-learning provides many advantages over the traditional education for both instructors and learners during the learning process. Obviously, there were many barriers that distance learning faces during their emergence in this sector. Therefore, Intelligent and Adaptive E-Learning Systems (IAEL) can provide adapted content and services to meet individual or group of learners to improve learning achievement and efficiency. IAEL systems are the next-generation products depict the supportive learning role that technology can rightfully play in correcting online-learning problems.

In this paper, we discuss the usage of artificial intelligence techniques and psychological science to eliminate barriers that exist in nowadays e-Learning systems. We developed an adaptive system using an open source learning management system. It is introduced to adapt learning objects for learners according to their learning styles and educational background. We propose a framework of an intelligent adaptive e-learning system using 3D virtual environment to improve the learners' progress. The framework provides an interactive environment for learners to increase their learning rates.

 

 

8. EL-MASHAD, Yehia: Assessment and Evaluation Process for the Management Information System Program at Delta Academy

 The Management Information System(MIS) Program at Delta Academy recognizes the need for periodic assessment and evaluation to make sure that the MIS graduates are achieving the Intended Learning Outcomes (ILO's) as specified by the National Agency for Quality Assurance and Accreditation in Egypt (NAQAAE) . This paper describes how the assessment and evaluation of the program ILO's leads to a Continuous Improvement and Quality Assurance (CIQA ) of the Annual Program Report. The methodology is explained to show how assessment data is compiled, how the data is analyzed, and how the analysis is translated into an understanding of the program and required action to improve the program. Useful templates for collecting and storing assessment data are described and examples of histograms are presented that demonstrate the assessment results. All this information is summarized in a series of standard "Intended Learning Outcomes at the Program Level" formats that present the evaluated results with the actions taken if needed.

9. FANG, Linda: USE OF WHATSAPP IN A TRANS-NATIONAL STUDIES SUBJECT IN SINGAPORE

Temasek Polytechnic (TP) is an established educational institution in Singapore. It offers diplomas to post-secondary students in the areas of Applied Science, Business, Design, Engineering, Humanities and Social Sciences, and Information Technology. In addition to core and diploma specialization subjects, students are offered Cross-Disciplinary Subjects (CDS) to broaden their education.

The Centre for Trans-Cultural Studies offers 21 CDS to equip students with skills to work in a globalized workplace. It's Trans-national Studies (TNS) CDS aims to help students acquire cross-cultural skills and knowledge targeted at preparing them for life in the globalised workplace. It is extremely well-received by students.

The TNS curriculum follows the Seven Dimensions of Culture Model by Trompanaas Hampden-Turner (Trompanaas & Hampden-Turner, 2008). Staff trained by them designed the curriculum for face-to-face delivery. Theory is taught in one hour lectures followed by application during two hour tutorials. In addition, there is a two-week residential stay at the Glocal Connect Village (GCV) on-campus apartments, where an international dinner and other cultural events are held. The range of teaching materials e.g. videos, PowerPoint slides, case studies, worksheets, activity sheets are aimed at engaging students in face-to-face classes. Online work is kept to a minimal. Students read announcements and submit assignments via Blackboard. They use the online Intercultural Awareness Profiler (Trompanaas Hampden-Turner Consulting, 2014) at the beginning of their CDS. Students are assessed through a pen-and paper test, a group project (research and presentation), a reflective journal, peer appraisal and their overall participation. This subject is for credit and grades influence the overall cumulative grade point average of students.

10. LIBRERO, Al Francis D.: Integrating an ePortfolio system in an online environment for higher learning

Over the years, electronic portfolios have been studied and used extensively by institutions of higher education for the benefits they bring on multiple fronts. An ePorftolio is a powerful tool for assessment and reflection for students and faculty alike. But unlike other assessment tools and methods that are confined within a single course, provided with an appropriate system, an ePortfolio is able to help facilitate an integrated academic program- level assessment of students. It also becomes an avenue for which content can be showcased at the individual or institutional level to the public.

This paper covers the initial stages of building an ePortfolio system and modifying the lesson plan and assessment policy of a pilot course in an undergraduate online academic program under the University of the Philippines Open University. These steps have been taken in an attempt to take advantage of the mentioned benefits, focusing on establishing an ePortfolio culture and developing students' ability to become reflective learners. This paper is also intended to be a foundation for additional research in enhancing teaching and learning outcomes.

11. LIBRERO, Al Francis D.: Benefits and challenges of online learning in a virtual world: the UPOU setting

The University of the Philippines Open University (UPOU) has looked into the use of virtual environments and serious games as learning tools in its academic programs. Ideas and exploratory work abound in many educational institutions. A survey conducted among students in the Bachelor of Arts in Multimedia Studies (BAMS) program revealed that most students in the program are already knowledgeable with a variety of video games. However, access to high quality equipment and Internet connectivity is a problem for some. On the other hand, general interest and openness is high among students with playing video games as part of their courses.

The use of Second Life, a persistent virtual world, has become part of a photography course in the BAMS program over the past two years. Through narratives from participating students as well as the course facilitator, this paper relates how the practice of photography skills and learning experience were enhanced, as well as the challenges that were encountered during the use of the virtual world.

 

12. LOUREIRO, Maria Joao, POMBO, Luci: Doctoral students' use of digital technologies in research processes

The literature on doctoral students' use of digital technologies for research purposes is scarce and recent. For instance, in the UK, the final report of the project "Researchers of tomorrow: The research behaviour of Generation Y doctoral students" was published online in 2012 (http://www.jisc.ac.uk/publications/reports/2012/researchers-of- tomorrow.aspx). The report point out that the so called "generation Y" doctoral students lack information related competences and are not neither trained or informed to be able to use the potentialities of the latest opportunities in the digital environment. The present exploratory case study aimed to characterize first year doctoral students' use of digital tools for research and supervision purposes and perceived sustainability factor that may facilitate/hinder their use. The data gathering techniques used were:

i) an online questionnaire (answered by 29 students of two doctoral programs) and

ii) documental analysis of students' research projects (in particular how they reflected the use of digital tools for information/data gathering/analysis). The results of the questionnaire and of the content analysis indicate that doctoral students are aware of the potentialities of diverse digital tools but only a few uses their full potential. For instance, a small number of doctoral students explore adequately the features of bibliographical databases, data analysis packages or collaborative writing tools. Recommendations regarding doctoral students training (still uncommon in the literature) are systematized, such as:

1) the evaluation and organization of online open resources

2) the delivery of online training workshops targeting students' needs or

3) the establishement of learning communities.

 

13. MELÉNDEZ, A. Gabriel: Film as Social Curricula

This presentation deals with the problematicrepresentation of multiethnic histories in American cinema. On the premise that movies contribute to hegemonic social knowledge, the presentation examines how this celluloid curriculum provides audiences with information about race, ethnicity, culture and foreignness. In particular it deals with the experienceof Latinos in U.S. cinema. This paper argues that instudying race films one can uncover the social paradigms operating in the U.S. at key moments. While noting the "deficit paradigm" produced by ethnic stereotyping the paper also discusses the immense fluidity and complexity of film representations.To illustrate the complexity of the Latino image in American film,this presentation will use excerpts from: Pueblo Indian Day School, Martyrs of the Alamo,Giant, and A Day Without a Mexican.

 

14. NIEMEYER, Dodie, GERBER, Hannah R.: Maker Culture in Videogames and Virtual Worlds: from Minecraft to the Classroom and Beyond

The maker culture focuses on using and learning practical skills and applying them creatively. It boasts a more participatory approach than traditional learning (Sharples, McAndrew, Weller, Ferguson, FitzGerald, Hirst, & Gaved, 2013) and is similar toa social constructivist perspective which emphasizes the social, cultural, and historical factors of experiences (Vygotsky, 1979 1981). This type of learning is inherent in maker culture and specifically in the maker culture of videogames and virtual worlds where students are creating their own world in the videogame as well as creating modifications to the game and videos and websites about the game for other players.

Framed with a New Literacy Studies (New London Group, 1996) perspective, this paper explores the literate connections within maker culture in videogames and virtual worldcommunities. This maker culture phenomenon is explored through a multiple-case study design which includes five males ages 8-10 and examines their involvement in Minecraft maker culture communities, as seen through experiences within the videogame itself, particularly within mediaoutlets such as Minecraft YouTube video creation. Findings suggest that students who are involved in maker culture communities are engaged in critical thinking, collaboration, and self-motivation (Gee, 2007). This has implications which could inform innovative instructional practices in school.

15. PAN, Cheng Chang (Sam), CORNELL, Richard: Design of online courses in higher education in light of the interplay between design maturity and student satisfaction: An observation made by thinking like an economist

Design thinking is a balance of art and science and also an equilibrium between heuristics and algorithms. Some argue it is a process that is both analytic and creative (Razzouk & Shute, 2012). Others (e.g., Nuzzaci, 2010) believe such process does not necessarily lend itself to any particular right or wrong answers. As "design" appears versatile given its nature, our study is intended to explore, by thinking like an economist, inspired by Bartlett (2010), the relationship between the maturity of course design and customer (student) satisfaction. In our preliminary findings we are able to find the commonality (i.e., quality) between end products (courses) at varying levels of maturity. The design of this study is quantitative in nature. A group of online courses (n=30) are purposively selected from a U.S. southern state university. Selection criteria are: (a) a 100% of student satisfaction, (b) a 100% Web-based course, and (c) with an optional, synchronous component. University course evaluation and other course-related information in the public domain are used. A peer evaluation form is used to categorize the maturity of selected courses. An inter-rater reliability testing is conducted and reports a high correlation coefficient, r >.8 suggesting there is a consistency or an agreement in assigned scores to the observed course features/functions and designs between the two raters. Drawn from the 2012 data, our findings suggest that even though there is a great variety of the adopted learning management system's functions and features (i.e., maturity) used among the studied courses, there remains a set of those that, as Pareto called, the vital few, that foster high student satisfaction. Communications protocol is just one of the few. Simplicity is another.

16. PAN, Cheng Chang (Sam), GARCIA, Francisco, DOLDSMITH, Clair: Technology and me - what do students think?

When it comes to strategic management of campus technology, understanding students' need and expectations of technology use is one of the top priorities of the senior management team of any institution of higher education. Given its unique mission and purpose, each university may have a respective need (and wish) list. Learning from its end-uses or constituents (e.g., students) is likely to have the university administration focus on the need and put the scarce resources in better use in an effort to create a more efficient social outcome--making all concerned parties better off. As part of 2013 EDUCAUSE Center for Applied Research (ECAR) Project, a Web questionnaire was administered at a U.S. southern state university that serves mainly Hispanic students (over 90%). A sample of over 1,900 students from the studied institution alone participated in the self-reported study in Spring 2013 with a margin of error around ± 3 %. The questionnaire was comprised of four instruments/sections in addition to student demographics. They are (a) devise use and ownership, (b), technology and the college experience, (c) learning environment, and (d) personal computing environment. An overview of the institution's results will be presented first. The institutional results are then compared to the overall findings of ECAR Technology Survey 2013 (n > 130,000) in four aspects: (a) (undergraduate) students' relationship with technology, (b) students' preference in modality, (c) students' readiness for mobile device use, and (d) students' perception of the boundary between academic life and their own social life. This oral presentation is intended for university administrators and researchers who are interested in learning how large-scale institutional data may inform decision makers.

17. PLÉH, Csaba: Cognitive and instruction science face the challenge of the new media

Relationships between psychology and education have been characterized by some eternal issues:

         what is the proper relationship between procedural and factual knowledge, KNOWING WHAT AND KNOWING HOW ?

         What are the domains of knowledge acquisition, from street level through school to on the job training ?

         what is the role of different media (demonstration, talk, reading) in acquisition?

         are the rules of acquisition changing over the life span?

With the advent of new media during the last generation these issues have been interestingly rephrased. The talk shall try to cover dome of these new challenges. Do cheep images really make our thinking more visual? Are the cheep and easily accessible texts leading to a more shallow processing (Greenfield, Carr)? Do the new search engines result in a reduced individual memory? Are the new media leading towards a more horizontal knowledge transfer in contrast to the traditional vertical transmission between generations?

There are rival techno optimist and techno pessimistic interpretations of these changes. I shall try to present a balanced view. This biologically anchored vision claims that while new technologies indeed change the acquisition patterns, they do so by reapplying the biologically determined existing knowledge transfer systems.

Regarding age related changes I shall present the natural pedagogy theory promoted by Csibra and Gergely. This theory claims that humans have a natural, biologically determined tendency to teach and learn from others, activated by pedagogical cues from the setting, and resulting in learning generic knowledge. A crucial issue is how universal are these principles over the life span, and how do different instructional media rely on them or question them.

18. STEVENSON, Michael, HEDBERG, John: Leading Learning in a Digital Age: a Mixed Methods Study

In the twenty-first century, school leaders are faced with the challenges of changing local, national and global contexts. While responding to the unique needs of their local school community, an increasing emphasis on national requirements in areas such as curriculum and teaching standards further compel leaders to ensure that teacher professional learning keeps pace with changes. This mixed methods case study sought to understand how school leaders can manage professional learning in twenty-first century contexts, which reflect the recent substantial changes to national curriculum and pedagogy. Although the concerns discussed are by no means unique to Australia, the evidence suggests that leaders prefer informal professional learning over more traditional structures (like one-day training courses and staff meetings), The impact of inspired online leadership - aided by the diverse communities of practice online - is emerging as an important area for future professional learning research.

This study examines how 102 school leaders across seventeen Australian government schools in a large metropolitan area lead in a digital age. Each school received approximately AU$10,000 of system funding as part of a wider program for schools to develop their own project addressing the areas of technology, pedagogy and the new national curriculum. The study incorporates a mixed methods design with two staged components. The first (qualitative) component explores the school context, including the decisions, actions and leadership styles of each school leader and how these impact on the development and implementation of their project.

 

19. SHEFFIELD, Rachel, DOBOZY, Eva, CAMPBELL, Chris: Teaching With Tpack: A Case Study of Pre-Service Science Education

Teacher education is in the grip of change. No longer is it possible to plan and implement lessons without considering the inclusion of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs). Students and teachers must be able to engage with diverse learning technologies efficiently and effectively in the search for 'the right information' at the 'right time' for the 'right purpose'. This paper provides insight into key organising patterns that characterise contemporary pre-service science education at a leading Australian university. In particular, the paper examines the overlap of technology, pedagogy and science content in the TPACK framework and its potential affordance for science educators, which is the intersection between technology knowledge, science pedagogy (information literacy and inquiry) and science content knowledge. The questions that this study grappled with were: What is the potential of the TPACK framework to help pre-service teachers integrate ICT and pedagogy in the science context? How can the TPACK framework be used in the science classroom? What contemporary open source technology tools help promote an science inquiry process? Some key findings illustrate that 90% of pre-service teachers thought the unit improved their understanding of the inquiry process, 88% reported more confidence in their understanding of science concepts and 94% of students reported an increase in their knowledge and confidence of Web 2.0 tools in supporting scientific inquiry in science. The implications of this study are that that the online inquiry improved students' knowledge and confidence in the skills and processes associated with inquiry and in science concepts.

20. STRAATEMEIER, Marthe: Math Garden: combining online adaptive training and monitoring of arithmetic skills in educational games

Math Garden, which was originally developed at the University of Amsterdam (the Netherlands), contains a challenging web environment in which children can practice their arithmetic skills by playing math games. The garden metaphor is used to stimulate children to maintain their mathematical abilities as they can nurture their plants by improving their mathematical ability and prevent their plants from withering by playing on a regular basis.

Math Garden uses a new methodology for computer adaptive practice and monitoring. In this methodology advanced psychometric algorithms are used that enable simultaneously tracking the abilities of persons and the difficulties of exercises. This ensures that the difficulty of the exercises is automatically adjusted to the skills of the child. All users, beginners and advanced users, always receive exercises that match their ability level. Math Garden is, therefore, motivating for users of all ability levels.At the same time, children's progress is automatically being monitored and detailed progress reports are presented to their teachers.

In this presentation Math Garden and its computer adaptive methodology will be demonstrated. In addition, the possibilities for education will be discussed.

21. CHIERO, Robin, BEARE, Paul, MARSHALL James, TORGERSON, Colleen: Evaluating the Effectiveness of E-Learning in Teacher Preparation

Teacher education in the United States struggles with the challenge of preparing and retaining high-quality teachers who can work effectively with all students, and research suggests that teacher preparation is a strong correlate of student achievement. This proposal addresses the conference theme of "E-learning and M-learning in tertiary education" by describing a study that compared the effectiveness of teacher preparation provided by the California State University (CSU) system through two pathways: (1) CalStateTEACH, an online-supported program that incorporates a unique delivery model using innovative technologies to prepare elementary teachers and (2) traditional campus-based programs.

The independent variable in the study was the pathway. The dependent variables were the ratings of preparation by program graduates at the end of their first year of professional teaching (N= 12,590) and their employment supervisors (N=3781).

The study analyzed data collected annually over a seven-year period. The instruments were two separate but parallel surveys designed to collect information about the extent to which the teachers' program prepared them for important teaching responsibilities. Individual items were combined into 17 composites to facilitate the analysis and interpretation of large amounts of complex data. Mean ratings by CalStateTEACH graduates were significantly higher on 16 of the 17 composites. Results add to the knowledge base of effective E-learning in higher education and suggest some characteristics that might contribute to effective E-learning.

22. TU, Chih-Hsiung: An Examination of Gaming Personality and Gaming Dynamics

Educators agree gaming encourages learners to gain a new perspective through active engagement in collaborative decision making to solve problems. This study investigated the research question: How will each of the four types of gaming personality in online learning (i.e., Explorer, Socializer, Killer, & Achiever) respectively predict the level of gaming dynamics in online discussion environments? This study concludes that three types of gaming personalities can serve as the predictors for gaming dynamics in a gamified online discussion environment. In other words, online learners whose gaming preferences and motivations are in Socializer, Achiever, and Explorer, are more likely to be motivated, more satisfied, and actively engage in online discussion environments.

23. VRASIDAS, Charalambos: Digital Alphabet Books and Science Fiction in Education: Two case studies of Literacy Projects

The Alphabets of Europe (AlphaEU - www.alphaeu.org) aims to promote the acquisition of multilingual awareness and language skills of pre-schoolers in various European countries, by developing, piloting, and implementing digital alphabet books and alphabet-related games and interactive activities. Targeted alphabets/languages include: English, German, Greek, Italian, Portuguese, and Romanian. Bringing young children into contact with foreign languages may result in faster language learning, improved mother tongue skills, and better performance in other areas. The project builds upon theoretical underpinnings that are associated with the way young children become aware about and begin to learn new languages. Research shows that young children learn languages in intuitive ways, such as creative exploration stimulated by curiosity. The younger they are exposed to different languages, the greater their ability to develop a feeling for the rhythm, the phonology and the intonation of these languages. AlphaEU uses digital media (ICT-supported image, sound, video, animation, hypertext, etc.) to enhance interactivity, stimulate curiosity, and encourage children to explore differences and similarities between languages and begin to formulate general ideas about how languages work.

AlphaEU uses digital media (ICT-supported image, sound, video, animation, hypertext, etc.) to enhance interactivity, stimulate curiosity, and encourage children to explore differences and similarities between languages and begin to formulate general ideas about how languages work. As the e-book format has reached maturity, now is the time to transfer these appealing alphabet-book ideas into digital form and utilize them for ELL purposes. During the presentation we will discuss our approach and lessons.

 

 

24. VRASIDAS, Charalambos, Theodoridou, Katerina, Avraamidou, Christiana Aravi Lucy: Science Fiction in Education: Case studies from classroom implementations

The Science Fiction in Educations (SciFiEd) project provides teachers with tools, training, and guidance that will assist them in enhancing their teaching, making science more attractive to students, connecting it with real-life issues such as the environment, and providing girls and other marginalised groups with access to science. The central project idea is to achieve this by incorporating Science Fiction in science teaching. The introduction of narrative in science education significantly increases students' memory, interest, and understanding.

The project aims:

          To increase pupils' motivation and achievement in science and other subjects, through

the introduction of Science Fiction in education.

          To enhance the quality of teaching Science and Technology, as well as an array of other

subjects to children aged between 9-15 years old.

  To connect science education with real-life issues and provide girls and other marginalised groups with better access to science education.

Learning designers, researchers, and teachers collaborated to develop interdisciplinary curricula units which were implemented in Cyprus public schools. These units combined learning outcomes from Language arts, Science, Design and technology, and civic education, infused with science fiction stories (books and films). Data were collected using classroom observations, questionnaires, interviews, focus groups and student artefacts. Findings show the remarkable potential of science fiction and narratives in supporting student engagement with subject areas.

25. WIT, Hans De: Collaborative Online International Learning and Virtual Exchange, new forms of internationalisation in higher education

Internationalisation is one of the key pillars in higher education, and mobility and exchange of students and scholars as well as internationalisation of the curriculum and teaching and learning the two main components. The traditional forms of internationalisation like other aspects in higher education are challenged by the developments and opportunities that ICT creates. MOOCs are discussed most regularly in media, politics and higher education itself as the new way of teaching and learning. There are other ways ICT can stimulate an interactive collaboration and intercultural interaction between students and teachers across borders. The address will discuss these new forms of collaborative online international learning and virtual exchange, how they can enhance the quality of teaching and learning and can bring new dimensions to the internationalisation in higher education.

 

 

 

POSTER SESSIONS

 

 

 

26. GERBER, Hannah R., PRICE, Debra P., MILLER, Melinda S.: Connective Research Approaches: A Methodological Framework for Researching Games-Based Learning

This interactive poster will showcase a beta of a prosocial gamified app that can help educate and draw attention to an issue that is a global problem: the trash/refuse issue in developing nations. Many developing nations lack both education and infrastructure to deal with issues of such magnitude, such as the overwhelming trash problem. Often trash ends up in the streets, burning and/or being scavenged by locals leading to hygiene and health issues. In particular Egypt and India have been struck by this problem in recent years. Part of the problem has been the reliance on foreign companies to manage the trash clean-up, rather than local initiatives (Al Bawaba, 2011). This project hopes to tackle both issues: educating the public while creating a problem solving climate for dealing with the issue and putting the issue of trash clean-up back in local companies' hands, thus providing local income to residents, and supporting the development of local infrastructure, thereby working towards sustainably growing the local economy.

The premise of this is an easy playable app is made for Android and iOS compatible phones and devices. The app, Trash Hero, will allow players to virtually travel to developing nations across the globe. The main screen will put the player in a road. As trash rains down, the players will move up the road at a set speed and be required to sort trash on the fly. The challenge will be presented through the speed at which they travel down the road, and the location to which they throw the trash (open can, closed can, recyclable etc). This will change quickly (much like Tetris, Angry Birds, Fruit Ninja, and other games) thus challenging the player to throw away to the proper location. If they miss the can, or throw into the wrong bin, trash begins to pile.

27. GERBER, Hannah R., PRICE, Debra P., MILLER, Melinda S., VOTTELER, Nancy K.: Connective Research Approaches: A Methodological Framework for Researching Games-Based Learning

This poster will introduce a methodological framework that can guide educational technology research, particularly games-based learning (GBL).

Games-based learning (GBL) is a growing trend, often used in contexts for bridging gaps with marginalized youth (Author 1 & Colleagues, 2014a; Author 1 & Colleagues 2014b; Authors, 2014; Van Eck, 2006). Educational technology research, particularly GBL, often focuses on learning outcomes that do not match state-mandated assessments, creating disconnects between schools, students, and teachers; this proposed framework aims to move beyond solely learning mismatched outcomes into understanding the way that learning methods impact GBL designed curricula.

To better understand the elements of student learning experiences within GBL frames, teacher uptake of GBL frames, and administrator support and understanding of GBL, we created a multi-tiered and multi-layered approach to collecting and analyzing GBL data. This requires moving beyond mixed research approaches, to a connective research approach. This approach fosters connections among related studies that take place in diverse contexts, by engaging in a meaning-making process across multiple disparate studies through a dialogic interaction with participants across various domains. With our research participants, we collaboratively "make sense" of the data from the context in which they are "bound" and move research into other contexts not related to immediate studies at hand. This allows emerging connections to appear across disparate, yet related studies, and allows the participants and the studies to become "unbound". We see this as similar to a bricolage (Levi- Strauss, 1962) weaving together approaches of critical dialectical pluralism (Onwuegbuzie & Frels, 2013), qualitative.

 

 

28. NEMOTO, Keisuke, SHIOTA, Shingo, KOBAYASHI, Keita, ONODA, Hiroshi, NAGATA, Katsuya: Development and Application of a Teaching Method Using a Communication Robot - Based on the Concept of a Weak Robot -

Recently, studies about learning through a communication robot have emerged and provided valuable insights. However, the use of communication robots has not yet been examined in-depth, although several schools have begun using such robots in their classes. This studydevelop is a new efficient teaching technique, using the communication robot "PALRO" made by Fuji Soft in an environmental learning program and evaluates the effects of such usage quantitatively. We proposed a three-stage usage, and we have applied and evaluated the first stage .

We taught the environmental lessons with the robot and compared the outcomes to those from traditional teaching. The results of the survey suggest that teaching a class with a robot was better at promoting awareness and interest in the environment among children than teaching a class traditionally.

29. SAKAI Kyohei; SHIOTA Shingo; MASUKAWA Hiroyuki; MATSUDA Naoko: Workshop on Internet Addiction -Development of the Internet Addiction Scale by Junior High School Students

In recent years, information devices such as smartphones and tablets have become increasingly popular across the world. These devices are capable of performing the net communication in a shorter time than the information conventional equipment, as well as adults, opportunities for the children to use and possession has increased, the information literacy of children introduced have been implemented also in schools for training. [Remark 1] On the other hand, cases of "Internet addiction," where the excessive use of mobile phones and the Internet hinder one's daily life, are increasing. This study explores the effects of the development and practice of information ethics education on junior high school students in order to encourage behavior change in response to Internet dependence.

30. VRASIDAS, Charalambos, Themistokleous Sotiris, Aravi Christiana: Make the Link

The Research and Development Centre CARDET (www.cardet.org) is participating as a partner in a 3-year (2013-2016) EuropeAid project "Technology challenging poverty: Make the Link". Other organizations who participate are Practical Action (Lead Partner- UK), the Engineers without Boarders (UK), the Centre for Science Education (UK), the Oxfam Italia and the CCE (Poland). 'Make the Link' envisions integrating issues around Technology Justice into the Science and Technology curricula of the early secondary classes of the EU member states' educational systems. Technology Justice - the right of all people to the technologies they need to live a life they value, without harming others now or in the future - will be explored in relation to the Millennium Development Goals, with a particular focus on sub-Saharan Africa. Technology Justice and Global Education methodologies (such a learner centred, participatory and dialogue led teaching), will be incorporated into exciting teaching materials, in a programme that includes schools outreach, teacher training and policy influence. A set of on-line and printed resources, will be developed, reaching over 13,000 teachers, while, training will be provided to more than 1600 teachers. Partners expect to gain the support from over 200 key influencers and decision makers for the project, resulting in the integration of global issues into the policy and/or high level practice at national and European context.