2018

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Volume 54, Issue 1-2-3-4

1. Roland Nuñez: College in the media: the relationship between repeated exposure and college expectations

 

2. Christina Hajisoteriou, Christiana Karousiou & Panayiotis Angelides: INTERACT: building a virtual community of practice to enhance teachers’ intercultural professional development

 

3. Theodora Voivonta & Lucy Avraamidou: Facebook: a potentially valuable educational tool?

 

4. Grace Y. Choi: Learning through digital storytelling: exploring entertainment techniques in lecture video

 

5. W. S. Konijn, D. R. Essink, T. de Cock Buning & M. B. M. Zweekhorst: Flipping the classroom: an effective approach to deal with diversity at higher education

 

6. Japhet E. Lawrence & Usman A. Tar: Factors that influence teachers’ adoption and integration of ICT in teaching/learning process

 

7. Omer Faruk Islim, Gul Ozudogru & Nese Sevim-Cirak: The use of digital storytelling in elementary Math teachers’ education

 

8. Wenhao David Huang & Eunjung Grace Oh: Motivational support from digital game-based learning environments (DGBLEs) for scientific topics designed by novice end users

 

9. Torrey Trust, Jeffrey Paul Carpenter & Daniel G. Krutka: Leading by learning: exploring the professional learning networks of instructional leaders

 

10. Apricot A. Truitt & Heng-Yu Ku: A case study of third grade students’ perceptions of the station rotation blended learning model in the United States

 

11. William R. Watson, Ji Hyun Yu & Sunnie L. Watson: Perceived attitudinal learning in a self-paced versus fixed-schedule MOOC

 

12. Min Jeong Song: Learning to teach 3D printing in schools: how do teachers in Korea prepare to integrate 3D printing technology into classrooms?

 

13. H. Smith Risser & Glenn Waddell: Beyond the backchannel: tweeting patterns after two educational conferences

 

14. Symeon Retalis, Fotini Paraskeva, Aikaterini Alexiou, Zoi Litou, Theofili Sbrini & Youla Limperaki: Leveraging the 1:1 iPad approach for enhanced learning in the classroom

 

15. Lasse Juel Larsen: Juicing the game design process: towards a content centric framework for understanding and teaching game design in higher education

 

16. Natalia Kucirkova: A taxonomy and research framework for personalization in children’s literacy apps

 

17. Xi Lin, Mingyu Huang & Leslie Cordie: An exploratory study: using Danmaku in online video-based lectures

 

18. Marko Divjak, Valentina Prevolnik Rupel & Kristijan Musek Lešnik: The impact of study attitudes and study behaviour on satisfaction of online students with the implementation of online study programmes

 

19. Juliana Raffaghelli, Patrizia Ghislandi, Susanna Sancassani, Luisa Canal, Rocco Micciolo, Barbara Balossi, Matteo Bozzi, Laura Di Sieno, Immacolata Genco, Paolo Gondoni, Andrea Pini & Maurizio Zani: Integrating MOOCs in physics preliminary undergraduate education: beyond large size lectures

 

20. Ruth Kerr, Ilaria Merciai & Maka Eradze: Addressing cultural and linguistic diversity in an online learning environment

 

21. Toru Fujimoto, Ai Takahama, Yu Ara, Yuri Isshiki, Kae Nakaya & Yuhei Yamauchi: Designing a MOOC as an online community to encourage international students to study abroad

 

22. James Brunton, Mark Brown, Eamon Costello & Orna Farrell: Head start online: flexibility, transitions and student success

 


1. Roland Nuñez: College in the media: the relationship between repeated exposure and college expectations

Media consumption can influence viewer perceptions and attitudes. Recent research on media’s effect on college students has failed to address gender differences. Using Mere Repeated Exposure Theory (traditionally used in marketing research), this study aims to answer three research questions regarding college media consumption and college perceptions: What types of fictional college media do college students consume? How does college media consumption differ by gender? How does fictional college media consumption relate to perceived college expectations? Results suggest that college students who consume high amounts of fictional college media are more likely to have positive attitudes towards partying and socializing in college. High consumers of college media, however, do not believe that college media influences their college perceptions. Men are more likely to socialize in college and are more aware than women that college media influences their college perceptions. Women are more likely to believe that college is difficult regardless of media consumption.

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2. Christina Hajisoteriou, Christiana Karousiou & Panayiotis Angelides: INTERACT: building a virtual community of practice to enhance teachers’ intercultural professional development

This project focuses on the design and implementation of an online professional development platform tailored to teachers’ needs to improve and promote their intercultural knowledge. Drawing upon the framework of virtual communities of practice, the project escapes from traditional professional development programmes. Although a total of 103 teachers participated in the project, in the implementation phase we carried out observations and interviews with a sub-sample of 40 teachers. Research findings indicate the generation of new knowledge regarding new pedagogical practices with respect to intercultural education as well as an increased collaboration among all involved stakeholders. Through the active involvement in the INTERACT platform, teachers became reflective practitioners by having opportunities to raise their voice and share views on their intercultural practices.

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3. Theodora Voivonta & Lucy Avraamidou: Facebook: a potentially valuable educational tool?

This paper is concerned with the educational value of Facebook and specifically how it can be used in formal educational settings. As such, it provides a review of existing literature of how Facebook is used in higher education paying emphasis on the scope of its use and the outcomes achieved. As evident in existing literature, Facebook has been used mainly for social networking purposes through the establishment and collaboration of social groups in educational settings. However, a set of recent studies has exemplified how Facebook can provide an empowering means for achieving educational goals and supporting students develop crucial skills (e.g., writing, networking, collaborating) by serving as members in various learning communities. Concluding, we argue that Facebook can provide a valuable pedagogical tool that enhances student learning. Hence, future research towards further exploring Facebook’s use in educational settings is warranted for the purpose of producing scientific evidence about the ways in which Facebook could be utilized to enhance learning.

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4. Grace Y. Choi: Learning through digital storytelling: exploring entertainment techniques in lecture video

Although online education is popularized, it is in a developing stage that continues to struggle with communicating and engaging with students. The question remains on how students can be better engaged in online educational materials that are presented in asynchronous media, especially in lecture videos. Thus, using engagement theory, the present study explored how online lecture videos can be improved by incorporating entertainment education. Using a public lecture video found on YouTube, an online survey (N = 133) was conducted to identify digital storytelling techniques and their effects. Results revealed that these techniques that are often utilized in entertainment became meaningful components to increase student engagement and learning outcomes. However, they can also negatively affect instructor credibility, which could suggest the need to increase instructors’ skills. The implications for the development of lecture videos using entertainment and its potential to positively impact online education are discussed.

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5. W. S. Konijn, D. R. Essink, T. de Cock Buning & M. B. M. Zweekhorst: Flipping the classroom: an effective approach to deal with diversity at higher education

Even though the flipped classroom is an increasingly popular method in education, a literature search shows a gap in research on this method in higher education. This article describes an experiment with two central questions: (1) How do students and lecturers assess the effectiveness of the FC method? And (2) What are crucial design elements? To be able to answer these questions we designed an experiment within a large-size, interdisciplinary, course. For three years we carefully monitored and evaluated the course. A mixed-method approach was used to collect data. Our findings show a positive contribution of the FC approach to the learning experience of students. We also found that a strong link between theory and practice is essential in the course design; combined with active learning we were able to involve students and stimulate them to reach a deeper level of understanding. Moreover, we believe that the FC approach offers opportunities to have a large interdisciplinary group, with different learning needs, work together on higher attainment levels.

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6. Japhet E. Lawrence & Usman A. Tar: Factors that influence teachers’ adoption and integration of ICT in teaching/learning process

Information communication technology (ICT) is becoming increasingly important in our daily lives and in our educational system. There is a growing demand on educational institutions to use ICT to teach the skills and knowledge students need for the digital age. The adoption and integration of ICT into teaching and learning environment provides more opportunities for teachers and students to work better in a globalised digital age. ICT has the potential to play an increasingly important role in education be it in classroom, administration and online instruction or other activities. There is tremendous potential for teachers and students to harness the power of ICT to improve the quality of teaching and learning in the classroom. The purpose of this study is to identify the factors that may influence teachers’ decision to adopt and integrate ICT in teaching and learning process. The study is chosen because of the strategic importance of ICT in education in general and particularly, its great potential, to transform the ways in which teaching is carried out in the classroom. It provides opportunities for greater flexibility, interactivity and accessibility for engaging teaching and learning at the individual, group and societal levels. There are a lot of studies in the area, but very little empirical research has been conducted to examine this phenomenon from the teachers perceptive. In order to achieve the study objectives, in-depth case studies, conceptualised within the grounded theory method will be used to generate thick description and explanation of the phenomenon. The diffusion theory and the technology acceptance model will provide the theoretical foundation for this study.

 

7. Omer Faruk Islim, Gul Ozudogru & Nese Sevim-Cirak: The use of digital storytelling in elementary Math teachers’ education

Technological devices are widely used in various forms and for various purposes with educational systems. Teachers are required to not only use technology with the utmost efficiency, but to also act as role models for students in terms of appropriate use of technology. However, many teacher candidates are not aware of the educational use of technology classroom; hence, technology must be especially integrated into undergraduate teacher training programs through courses and field experience. Various methods, techniques, tools, and equipment are utilized in order to improve the efficiency of teaching and learning processes in the classroom, of which digital storytelling is one of them. The use of digital stories in education is beneficial both for teachers and students. For this reason, this research investigates the use of digital stories in mathematics education as well as the opinions and experiences of mathematics teacher candidates about creating, using, and evaluating digital stories. Data of the study were collected via semistructured interviews, transcribed, and content analyzed. The results of the study showed that prospective math teachers preferred GoAnimate program to create digital stories due to its ease of use, design, and the characters and visuals it suggests. Furthermore, the prospective teachers were found to aspire to use digital stories in their future careers.

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8. Wenhao David Huang & Eunjung Grace Oh: Motivational support from digital game-based learning environments (DGBLEs) for scientific topics designed by novice end users

The integration of digital game-based learning environment (DGBLE) enhanced by technology in recent years has been hampered by its complexity and difficulty in realistically addressing teachers’ instructional needs. The pedagogical gap between what teachers think a DGBLE can deliver and what DGBLE can actually offer remains substantial. To preliminarily address the gap, this present qualitative study adopted an end-user-development lens to understand how K-12 teachers as novice end users interpret and design game features in their DGBLEs. The design ideas, situated in teaching scientific subjects, were collected from 19 pre-service teachers in a public university in the United States by semi-structured interviews based on game features identified in the literature. The data analysis, grounded in the ARCS (attention, relevance, confidence, satisfaction) motivational design model, employed the direct content analysis method and revealed the distribution of motivational support among participants’ DGBLEs design ideas. The finding suggested that participants were more likely to incorporate intrinsic motivational support than extrinsic support in their design. This trend could compromise the motivational support of DGBLEs when students need additional extrinsic motives toward the end of learning processes. Further, the study illuminates the importance of incorporating end users’ perspectives early on in the DGBLE design process.

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9. Torrey Trust, Jeffrey Paul Carpenter & Daniel G. Krutka: Leading by learning: exploring the professional learning networks of instructional leaders

Leaders in education are often the sole person in their particular role in a school, and have thus frequently struggled with professional isolation. In recent years, social media tools such as Facebook and Twitter have created new opportunities for educators, including instructional leaders, to expand their professional learning networks (PLN) to include a wider array of people, spaces, and tools. This manuscript presents the findings of a qualitative study of 400 instructional leaders’ perceptions of their PLNs. Instructional leaders in our sample included principals, superintendents, librarians, and technology or curriculum specialists, coaches, and facilitators. Data were collected from a convenience sample via an anonymous online survey. Respondents described diverse, multifaceted networks composed of people, spaces, and tools. They reported that their PLNs supported their growth as learners, educators, and leaders. Participants asserted that their PLN activities positively impacted their learning and practice in a number of different ways. PLN impacts were described in terms of particular knowledge and skills, but also in relation to dispositions and community. We discuss our findings in relation to the extant literature. These findings have implications for defining the present and future of instructional leaders’ professional learning.

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10. Apricot A. Truitt & Heng-Yu Ku: A case study of third grade students’ perceptions of the station rotation blended learning model in the United States

The purpose of this case study was to explore the experiences of 31 third graders who experienced learning in a Station Rotation blended learning setting over the period of one semester in the United State. These students participated in student focus group interviews and completed student questionnaires during the middle and the end of the semester. The student focus group interviews were first transcribed and coded. The students’ responses from the questionnaires were then coded and compared with the findings from the student focus group interviews. The results revealed five positive themes (variety of activities, technology, learning, fun, and getting help) and two negative themes (challenging work and technology). These emerged themes from the student focus interviews and the student questionnaires explain the perceptions the students had about the Station Rotation blended learning model. Finally, discussion for current study as well as recommendations for future research were provided.

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11: William R. Watson, Ji Hyun Yu & Sunnie L. Watson: Perceived attitudinal learning in a self-paced versus fixed-schedule MOOC

This study (N = 427) examined perceived attitudinal learning gains (i.e., cognitive, affective, and behavioral learning) related to the course topic by comparing a self-paced version of a Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC) with a fixed-scheduled version. Independent samples t-tests revealed that those in a self-paced classroom were more likely to perceive higher levels of attitudinal learning gains and satisfaction than those in a fixed-scheduled MOOC. Those enrolling in the self-paced course also identified significantly more diverse reasons for enrolling. Learners in both courses identified course videos as the most impactful instructional component. Implications for the design of self-paced MOOCs are discussed.

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12. Min Jeong Song: Learning to teach 3D printing in schools: how do teachers in Korea prepare to integrate 3D printing technology into classrooms?

3D printing implementation in educational contexts has gained considerable attention in recent years. However, research shows that both in-service and pre-service teachers lack digital literacy and the confidence required to teach this emerging technology. This study reports the current challenges and opportunities in 3D printing education in Korea and identifies the range of knowledge required for teachers to integrate 3D printing technology into classrooms in meaningful ways. The technological, pedagogical, and content knowledge (TPACK) framework was used to analyze the certificate program for 3D printing educators and in-service teachers’ practices. The findings from interviews with 10 in-service teachers and participant observation in the 3D printing training workshop for pre-service teachers revealed that technological knowledge is overly emphasized in the 3D printing teacher training curriculum. Thus, many in-service teachers develop their content knowledge and pedagogical knowledge by exchanging ideas with other teachers online and running project-based courses with flipped classroom approaches. Two potential paths were discovered for developing curricula that cross over the domains of the TPACK framework to successfully integrate the technology into classrooms: collaboration between teachers in different subject areas and industry experts to develop technical knowledge and curriculum, and contextualizing 3D printing technology in relation to open-source digital culture.

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13. H. Smith Risser & Glenn Waddell: Beyond the backchannel: tweeting patterns after two educational conferences

Mathematics teachers are using Twitter as a backchannel at conferences. Understanding whether teachers are using Twitter differently at traditional conferences like the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Annual as compared to new conference models like TwitterMathCamp (TMC) is important. Tweets surrounding the 2015 NCTM Annual and TMC2015 were collected and analyzed to determine the differences in tweeting behavior of the mathematics teachers. Our results showed teachers use Twitter in common ways, despite the attention placed on social media at new conferences.

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14. Symeon Retalis, Fotini Paraskeva, Aikaterini Alexiou, Zoi Litou, Theofili Sbrini & Youla Limperaki: Leveraging the 1:1 iPad approach for enhanced learning in the classroom

Mobile technologies are integrated parts of our lives, and their use in educational settings could provide new, exciting opportunities for teaching and learning. The integration of the iPad in education, in particular, is thought to bring a paradigm shift and transform the twenty-first century classroom. However, as it is relatively new and experiences from pilot projects are just now beginning to surface, little concrete research on how it can be effectively adopted in the classroom and in other pedagogical activities exists. This raises the question of how to support students and teachers to realize the full potential of the 1:1 iPad approach. We followed the principles of action research in order to explore students’, teachers’ and parents perception of 1:1 iPad approach in the classroom. Towards this, we conducted a mixed-method research and combined quantitative and qualitative data. For the needs of this research, we employed a set of questionnaires, interviews and best practice lesson plans and performed descriptive and inferential statistical analysis. The results indicate that students are more positive with reference to the iPad being an excellent tool that helps them organize and understand the course. Our future work will embrace iPad’s educational potential and emphasize on the design and implementation of orchestrated learning content.

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15. Lasse Juel Larsen: Juicing the game design process: towards a content centric framework for understanding and teaching game design in higher education

The aim of this article is to advance a framework for understanding and teaching game design in higher education, in order to address complexities inherent in teaching game design courses. Everyday teaching and learning game design often deviate from the standard textbook model of game design. In reality everyday teaching and learning operate with handling game design curriculum, how to think games, and how to organise the development process. The presented framework merge curriculum, thinking, and process guided by the game design concept of juiciness. The framework will be presented by dismantling the standard textbook model of game design into three; game design (curriculum), game design thinking (thinking), and game development (organisation). In this perspective game design is concerned with game mechanics, game design thinking preoccupied with paper prototyping, metaphor, and framing, while game developments addresses player experience including play and game testing. This article will coin vertical design as juiciness as opposed to horizontal design understood as expanding system layout. Juiciness will be placed as a guiding principle in the relationship between designers and designed content as an aspect of designer intentions and motivations. Lastly, the content centric framework will be presented by merging game design, game design thinking, game development, vertical design with selected aspects of accepted software development strategies as an approach to teaching and learning game design in higher education.

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16. Natalia Kucirkova: A taxonomy and research framework for personalization in children’s literacy apps

This paper reviews the key types of personalization in children’s literacy apps to propose a taxonomy and research framework for future empirical studies Systematic content analysis was used to identify the amount and type of personalization in a hundred most popular children’s literacy apps/digital books. Titles with three and more personalization features were screened qualitatively to identify what can be personalized, how personalization occurs and who personalizes the experience. Similar themes were synthesized into a research framework that outlines how identity, self-evaluation and agency relate to personalization. The discussion sets the agenda for future research, design and evaluation of children’s digital books.

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17. Xi Lin, Mingyu Huang & Leslie Cordie: An exploratory study: using Danmaku in online video-based lectures

This exploratory study investigated the use of Danmaku in video-based lectures as a method to enhance learners’ interactions and course engagement in online instruction. Visually, Danmaku is real-time, horizontal, text-based display of commentary that uses subtitles in a manner widely employed in Animation, Comic, and Game (ACG) videos in Asian countries. To assess the potential value of Danmaku for online instruction and learner interaction, this study employed an inductive content analysis using Danmaku from 934 online lecture videos. Data were collected from Bilibili.tv, a video-sharing website based in China. This study concluded that Danmaku could function as an effective way to enhance learners’ interaction, increase course engagement, and improve learning experiences while participating in online video-based lectures.

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18. Marko Divjak, Valentina Prevolnik Rupel & Kristijan Musek Lešnik: The impact of study attitudes and study behaviour on satisfaction of online students with the implementation of online study programmes

The main objective of the research was to analyse the study attitudes and study behaviour of online students at DOBA Business School. Furthermore, the aim was to evaluate the interrelationship between study attitudes and study behaviour and to assess the predictive value of the two sets of variables for students’ general satisfaction with the study programmes. A total of 331 students participated in the web survey. Participants expressed the most positive attitudes towards the use of technology and flexibility of online learning, while the absence of personal contacts was also perceived as highly favourable. Average scores for both deep and strategic approaches were quite high, while the surface approach was much less prominent . Participants were highly engaged with their teamwork assignments, whereas proactive communication was somewhat less developed . Study attitudes seem to be far more powerful predictors of general satisfaction than study behaviour, which is not surprising. Satisfaction is thought to be the result of the complex subjective evaluation of all relevant aspects of the study programme implementation, as they were measured by attitudinal subscales.

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19. Juliana Raffaghelli, Patrizia Ghislandi, Susanna Sancassani, Luisa Canal, Rocco Micciolo, Barbara Balossi, Matteo Bozzi, Laura Di Sieno, Immacolata Genco, Paolo Gondoni, Andrea Pini & Maurizio Zani: Integrating MOOCs in physics preliminary undergraduate education: beyond large size lectures

In this paper, the authors discuss the effectiveness of MOOCs as part of a pedagogical strategy aimed at supporting Physics’ preliminary undergraduate students in large-size lectures. Our study is based on an experimental activity based on a blended course, which integrated a parallel MOOC delivered through the POK (PoliMi Open Knowledge, http://www.pok.polimi.it), the Politecnico di Milano’s MOOC portal. The blended model also delivered face-to-face activities that included intensive technology enhanced learning, like feedback based on clickers. Specifically, we introduce the several elements of the approach (the tutors’ pedagogy, the adoption of clickers, the diversity amongst learning groups) and its process of implementation. The findings in this study highlight that the integrated model is effective in terms’ of students’ learning both for small and large size lectures. More importantly, it was found that the students in large size lectures demonstrated similar or even better performance than students in a small size group. Moreover, the students in all sizes lectures showed higher satisfaction with the MOOCs’ against other factors adopted within the learning design.

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20. Ruth Kerr, Ilaria Merciai & Maka Eradze: Addressing cultural and linguistic diversity in an online learning environment

Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are a growing phenomenon in the USA and Europe. A few big American platforms lead the field in terms of numbers of learners, institutions and courses on board. These platforms act as transnational platforms, and attract many European institutions because of the opportunities for visibility and branding they offer. Similarly in Europe, many platforms have emerged but no single pan-European initiative has found its own space. This is probably because of the complexity involved inaccommodatingdiverse languages, cultures and teaching approaches within the rigid structure of a Learning Management System (LMS). This paper looks at one possible response to the challenge of creating a single learning space via a multilingual and multicultural MOOC platform called EMMA, European Multiple MOOC Aggregator. It presents the results of two learner surveys with qualitative and quantitative data analysis collected within the EMMA project which aimed to assess user satisfaction with the learning experience on the platform, and whether it addressed the issue of “cultural diversity.” Initial indications suggest that learners appreciated and used the inbuilt translation systems in a multilingual approach, and that learners perceived the features and tools offered by the EMMA platform as European in feel.

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21. Toru Fujimoto, Ai Takahama, Yu Ara, Yuri Isshiki, Kae Nakaya & Yuhei Yamauchi: Designing a MOOC as an online community to encourage international students to study abroad

In this study, a massive open online course (MOOC) titled “Studying at Japanese Universities” was designed. The purpose of the course was to encourage international students to study in Japan. Accordingly, it is intended to build an online community to afford international students to encourage and support each other and realise their student lives in Japan. This paper outlined how the course was designed and further reported the results of the early outcomes of how the students received the course. The results indicated that the course reaches the target age group while also attracting a diverse audience. It is further been specified that students can communicate with others who have common interests. Furthermore, students share their thoughts and concerns about their plans to study in Japan and receive mutual support from the online community. Those who are interested in producing MOOCs as an educational environment for global outreach should find the results of the study beneficial.

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22. James Brunton, Mark Brown, Eamon Costello & Orna Farrell: Head start online: flexibility, transitions and student success

This qualitative case study examined the effect of a six-week, pre-induction socialization Massive Open Online Course (MOOC), “Head Start Online”, on participants’ constructions of their expected study experiences in online or part-time higher education. The data analysed in this study were gathered from participant posts in discussion forums. The forums were purposively located within a course designed to provide a supportive resource and interactive platform for these learners during the early stages of the study lifecycle. The key themes constructed through the analytic process were: goals; community & support; balance; and learning. The data revealed that participant constructions of expected higher education experiences reflected the key messages that the course was designed to communicate and reinforce. In addition, the findings illustrate how specific design elements of the Head Start Online MOOC supported the creation of an engaged learning community within course discussion forums.

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